Walk the Walk

Not exactly what I was aiming for but ….

Two multi-effects devices – the Korg Mini Kaoss Pad 2S and the Zoom MS-70CDR.

The Zoom is an epic pedal. CDR stands for chorus, delay, reverb, and there are a whopping 86 types to choose from. Plus you can chain up to six effects in series (on the one pedal!). Plus it’s stereo. Plus patch memories. Plus onboard tuner. Plus the price! It’s so cheap!! For this video I have a stereo delay, a filter delay, a modulated delay and a plate reverb applied in that order to the volca keys. The quality of some of the effects falls short of the more expensive pedals they’re meant to be mimicking, but for the price you can’t complain. Ever since the volcas came out, people have been bugging Korg to produce a volca mixer. I’d like to add …. if you do, please incorporate sends and something like the MS-70CDR.

The Mini Kaoss Pad is also a multi-effect (100 types), but you can only use one at a time. Each effect has two parameters wired to the X-Y touchpad for creating all kinds of motion in the sound. It’s a DJ tool, not a guitar pedal, and I’ve still to get to grips with it. Maybe in the next video.

Snowflakes Are Resting

Testing the “flux” function of the volca keys with a Tomita-ish piece.

The first time round is just the volca keys, the second with a Mini Kaoss Pad delay, and the third with the volca bass doing a passable theremin impression over the top. Listen to the tone of the volca bass. Can’t praise it enough.

The volcas are basically 16 step sequencers, but there are ways to get more out of the volca keys. First off, it has settings for 1/1, 1/2 and 1/4 tempo. If you set to 1/2, the sequence cycles once to every two cycles of the volca beats for example, so the unit’s 16 steps last 32 steps in all. At 1/4 they last four cycles, i.e. 64 steps. But even if you set the keys to 1/2 or 1/4 tempo, there are still only 16 notes in the sequence – they’re just spread out over double or quadruple the time. You can sustain those 16 steps, but you can’t play anything between them.

Luckily, the keys has another mode – “flux”. Flux allows you to play and record notes freely across any tempo without the 16 step restriction. The resolution isn’t infinitely fine though – after a bit of experimenting I found its limit at 8 notes per step – but still, that gives you 16 x 8 = 128 steps stretched over four cycles to play with.

Here’s how to input the notes cleanly ….

  1. set “tempo range settings” to “full”
  2. set flux on, tempo to 1/4
  3. tempo dial all the way down to minimum
  4. connect to the volca beats with the keys first in the chain
  5. set up a snare metronome on the beats ….
  6. set the beats snare on 1, 4, 8, 12 steps
  7. stutter time to 1.2 and depth to taste
  8. use active step to activate only the steps you want to record
  9. record notes

If you use the volca key’s Tempo Delay or an external delay, you can get some very nice sounding arpeggios.

Active Step is also useful during performance. Instead of enabling and disabling single steps, you’re dealing with groups of eight notes. I expect you can do all kinds of things with 128 steps if you plan ahead a little. If you use the keys in polyphonic mode, that’s 128 sustaining chords in 16 groups of 8.

Since the tempo is set to 1/4, and the tempo dial to something low, the beats will be crawling along. I was thinking though, you could maybe run the sync signal through a delay to multiply it x8 to get the beats and bass moving at a cycle of 16 notes rather than 16 steps. Something to try later.

STFU

A break between equipment change didn’t really work. I should have started up again the week after switching. Instead, no music and no posts for over a month.

This is the three analogue Volcas – beats, bass and keys. They’re all running through a Mini Kaoss Pad 2S ping pong delay and a Behringer RV600 hall reverb for width. I’m doing the Volcas to learn how to tweak parameters rather than play my way through a piece, but keeping things evolving and interesting turns out to be a lot harder than it looks. I’ve failed miserably here. Can’t keep my fingers off the keys.

This is the kind of thing I’m aiming for.

U Robot

The last littleBits Synth Kit I’ll be doing for a while.

I’ll come back to it if they release the LFO bit that’s supposed to be in development. A proper ADSR envelope would be nice too. In the meantime, I’ll keep my eye on prices and try to snap bits up when they’re cheap. One more oscillator, another filter and two more mixers would be useful. Also a second speaker so I can split outputs to different effects.

There’s another problem I’ve found with the kit. The pink connectors at either end of each bit are sturdy, but the supports on the underside of the keyboard and mixer bits break far too easily. The mounting boards are part of the problem – you really have to push to get a bit in then prise and pull to get it out. So I’ve broken the keyboard and a mixer trying to get them from the board. I’ll have to glue the supports back on.

It’s been fun using the littleBits kit, but I think I’ve fallen in love with the Volca Bass. What a fantastic little instrument it is, especially for the price. You can tease so much variation out of it, and it all sounds amazing. There are no effects on the “U Robot” bass at all. I’m not even using all three oscillators, just two of them slightly detuned. The LFO is synced to the tempo and is modulating the filter cutoff with a square wave to give a delay effect.

It’s time to move on to the Volcas in fact. Up until now, I’ve been using the Bass and Beats for backing only – simple sixteen step sequences that run from the beginning to the end of a piece. But the Volcas’ real strength is in their tweakability. It’ll be the same sixteen step sequences as before, but instead of keeping things interesting by playing a melody over the top, I’ll be muting/soloing, tweaking parameters, swapping parts, that kind of thing. My instinct is always to play, to avoid too much repetition. So tweaking without playing is going to be a challenge.

Jelly Tot

I thought I’d try to stick to the littleBits Synth Kit’s natural sound this time and do something robotic, but I veered way off course. I ended up with this vaguely latin-sounding thing. Not one of the better ones.

One more from the Synth Kit, then I think I’d better move on.

A couple of things I’ve learnt using the Synth Kit and two Volcas. First, it’s ok if the Volca Bass is out of tune. The bass in “jelly tot” is a full semitone out with respect to the SQ-1 sequence, and if I hiked the pitch up an octave it would sound awful. But if there’s enough bottom, you can get away with it. This gives you more freedom to move about with the melody.

Second thing, if you do keep the melody moving and interesting, you can get away with those sixteen step sequences for quite a while. In “jelly tot”, the SQ-1 sequence, the drums, and the bass are all simple sixteen step sequences that last about two seconds. The piece is over two minutes long, so they all repeat over sixty times!

End Game

It turns out the littleBits keyboard isn’t faulty – it’s the oscillator causing the problem and it’s not a fault. The littleBits oscillator has a potentiometer labelled “pitch” and a little dial labelled “tune”. This is misleading. What the dial label should actually read is “calibrate”. I bet almost everyone using the kit thinks it’s a fine tune dial, but its real purpose is to adjust how the component maps incoming voltage to outgoing pitch. Very confusing.

Another piece using the sixteen steps of the SQ-1. This time you can hear clearly what the El Capistan is doing to the sequence. I wish the littleBits synth kit had a full ADSR envelope. It’s only attack and decay. Once you put the envelope in the chain, you lose the ability to sustain. The envelope just runs its course.

The Next Day They Were Gone

February, the darkest month of the year. Freezing temperatures. The flu. And this year, I’m working my way through a box set of soul-crushing slaughterfest “Game Of Thrones”. There’s no way I could do anything but a dirge this week.

The humble littleBits Synth Kit producing some fairly good strings. Of course, it’s the not-so-humble BigSky that’s doing most of the work. It’s set on cloud mode. And the El Capistan is mangling the wave pre-reverb to give some depth. More detune between the oscillators would give a richer sound, but for the reasons listed below wasn’t practical. Volca Beats providing barely audible drums and Volca Bass filling in the bottom end.

The biggest problem with the littleBits Synth Kit is tuning and tracking. I can have two oscillators perfectly in tune, but come back the next day and they’ll be out of whack. This is at the same room temperature and after they’ve had some voltage through them. Then there’s tracking. Regardless of conditions, an octave on the keyboard is never an octave on the oscillator. And the margin of error seems to vary depending on which oscillator module I’m using. That’s why much of this stuff I’m doing sounds out of tune half the time. There’s no way to compensate.

Long Run

I bought five new bits for the littleBits Synth Kit, three of them to give me some interface other than the teeny-weeny keyboard – a button, a slider and a bend sensor. The other two are the inverter and logic XOR bits. I found a video showing how to emulate ring modulation with the XOR, so I thought I’d try that.

The arpeggio sequence is one littleBits oscillator driven by the SQ-1. The lead sound I’m playing is two oscillators sending through filters to the XOR bit. I have the bend bit modulating the frequency of both filters. Depending on the filter cutoff and peak settings, it’s possible to get some seriously screaming distortion going. I tried attaching the bend sensor to my index finger with elastic bands. That was fun, but difficult to control accurately enough. So I fixed it to the board and I’m just bending it with my left hand.

This series of doodles with the littleBits kit is to find out how much useable music I can get out of it. I thought I’d do ten in all before moving on to the next thing. So, six down four to go.

Sneak

Noodle on Friday, refine on Saturday, record and up on Sunday, forget on Monday. The best thing about doing music this way is that you needn’t spend weeks (in my case years) with an idea trying to make it perfect. Once it’s presentable, you can let it go and you’re free to move on to the next thing. Nobody’s going to listen anyway! Who cares!!

Actually, I do care a little. For the first time ever I feel like I belong to an online community, although no one has taken notice yet. There are loads of people doing the same thing, many with similar equipment. It’s interesting to see how they use it and what kind of music comes out.

The Volca Beats for drums and Volca Bass for bass. No effects on those. This time I’m splitting the output from the SQ-1 all over the place. It’s going to drive the arpeggio sequence on one littleBits oscillator, and to trigger the envelope of the melody line I’m playing. I also have it triggering filters on both the sequence and the lead, although in the end I left it as a subtle effect rather than ramping it up to squidge level. The melody I’m playing is two oscillators. One is tuned, but the other I’ve turned all the way to the right. That’s what’s giving it the percussive tone you can hear especially on low notes. LittleBits is running through a Strymon Big Sky set on room reverb.

Everything into an Alto ZMX52 mixer and aux out to a Tascam DR-07MKII recorder. Single take. No dubbing or processing. Video recorded on a Pentax Q.

I Am Not Ashamed

It’s not easy to escape musical roots. For me, everything veers towards the eighties. Ten years ago, that would have been embarrassing. But as far as I can tell, previously uncool eighties-style musical elements have been sort of welcomed back into the fray in the same way that fifties was in the eighties and seventies was in the …. I’m struggling to think. Sixties in the nineties? It’s a funny business, music and fashion. No absolutes. Everything resurfaces. Everything comes around for a second try.

I am not ashamed.

I bought another oscillator and a fork module and I was planning to do some big orchestral sounds but this is what came out. Three voices from the littleBits Synth Kit …. the main arpeggio driven by the SQ-1, a bit of percussive dirt using the random module (also driven by the SQ-1), and the plucked lead sound. These are all going through the BigSky on shimmer again.

The Volca Beats is providing drums, the Volca Bass the bass. No effects on those. The Sync Out on the SQ-1 is connected to the In of the Volca Beats, but for some reason I’m only getting the first eight steps cycling. I tried testing the Volca Bass and it ran the whole sixteen step cycle. Something to solve.

Everything into an Alto ZMX52 mixer and aux out to a Tascam DR-07MKII recorder. Single take. No dubbing or processing. Video recorded on a Pentax Q.

Debut on bass for my left index finger!